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Above the Clouds: The Airplanes
>> Ins and Outs of an Airplane
>> Prep and Color Your Airplane for Flight
>> Name that Airplane
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Learning that Delivers: Site Guide
 

Name That airplane

In the early days, people had to use special airmail stamps on letters specified to travel by airplane, rather than train or truck. Many postage stamps have featured airplanes.

Study these photographs and look for the characteristics of each airplane. Here are some of the differences and similarities:

Curtiss Jenny JN-4H

The top wing is longer than the lower wing.

The guide wires are prominent on the top of the upper wing.
The pilot used the rear cockpit; the airmail service used the forward cockpit for a cargo hold.
Jenny biplanes
Jenny biplanes.
de Havilland DH-4

The two wings are equal in length.

The engine appears to hang a few inches below the fuselage.
The pilot used the rear cockpit; the airmail service used the forward cockpit for a cargo hold.
de Havilland biplane
de Havilland biplane.
Junkers JL-6
The Junkers JL-6 is a monoplane (an airplane with one wing).
To the rear of the cockpit is an enclosed cabin with enough room for passengers and the cargo hold.
Junkers-Larsen JL-6 monoplane
Junkers-Larsen JL-6 monoplane.

Put your visual skills to the test. Find the matching airmail stamps:

27 different postage stamps

There are 6 matched pairs - see if you can find them all. (Rollover the image to see the answers!)

Review This Activity's Classroom Objectives, Subjects & Age Level.

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