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Birds in the Garden

Birds play a vital role in controlling pests, contributing to pollination, and adding flying beauty and color to a garden. Arthur and Alan Singer, the two creators of this superb artwork, are the first known father-son team to develop art for a US stamp series. The father, Arthur, created the bird design, and Alan fashioned the flower design. At the time of their issue, these were the best-selling stamps in US postal history.
 

State Birds and Flowers Issue

 

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20c Michigan approved stamp art
20c Michigan approved stamp art

Michigan approved stamp art
ISSUE State Birds and Flowers
MEDIUM board; gouache
ILLUSTRATORS Arthur and Alan Singer
ART DIRECTOR Bradbury Thompson
FIRST DAY OF ISSUE April 14, 1982

The Robin, one of the most common migratory birds in North America, was chosen as the Michigan state bird in 1931. The Robin is also the state bird of Connecticut and Wisconsin. The Robin prefers to eat earthworms and insects, such as termites and grubs, and is attracted to gardens with fruiting trees and plants, such as crabapples, bayberries, and cherries.

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Michigan stamp
Michigan stamp

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20c Alabama approved stamp art
20c Alabama approved stamp art

Alabama approved stamp art
ISSUE State Birds and Flowers
MEDIUM board; gouache
ILLUSTRATORS Arthur and Alan Singer
ART DIRECTOR Bradbury Thompson
FIRST DAY OF ISSUE April 14, 1982

The Yellowhammer Woodpecker, also known as the Northern Flicker, was designated Alabama’s state bird in 1927. Alabama’s southern climate allows the Yellowhammer to maintain a year-round presence in Alabama gardens. Foraging primarily on the ground, the Yellowhammer eats spiders, mites, berries and seeds, including the large brown seeds produced by the flowering Camellia evergreen shrub.

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Alabama stamp
Alabama stamp

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20c New Hampshire approved stamp art
20c New Hampshire approved stamp art

New Hampshire approved stamp art
ISSUE State Birds and Flowers
MEDIUM board; gouache
ILLUSTRATORS Arthur and Alan Singer
ART DIRECTOR Bradbury Thompson
FIRST DAY OF ISSUE April 14, 1982

The Purple Finch has been the state bird of New Hampshire since 1957. It shows its brightest colors during the summer season. The Purple Finch eats mainly seeds of coniferous trees, elms, tulip poplars, and maples. It also eats berries and fruit, including cherries and crabapples.

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New Hampshire stamp
New Hampshire stamp

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20c New Mexico approved stamp art
20c New Mexico approved stamp art

New Mexico approved stamp art
ISSUE State Birds and Flowers
MEDIUM board; gouache
ILLUSTRATORS Arthur and Alan Singer
ART DIRECTOR Bradbury Thompson
FIRST DAY OF ISSUE April 14, 1982

The Roadrunner, commonly called the Chaparral bird, was designated New Mexico’s state bird in 1950. One of nature’s speediest birds, the Roadrunner is named for its tendency to run rather than fly, though it will take flight to evade predators. Appearing in the gardens of the Southwest, Roadrunners eat dragonflies and yucca weevils.

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New Mexico stamp
New Mexico stamp

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20c Virginia approved stamp art
20c Virginia approved stamp art

Virginia approved stamp art
ISSUE State Birds and Flowers
MEDIUM board; gouache
ILLUSTRATORS Arthur and Alan Singer
ART DIRECTOR Bradbury Thompson
FIRST DAY OF ISSUE April 14, 1982

The Cardinal, also known as the Northern Cardinal, has been the Virginia state bird since 1950 and is the official bird of six other states. The Cardinal eats insects and a variety of seeds, such as sunflower seeds, and berries produced by the flowers of the Dogwood tree during the spring.

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Virginia stamp
Virginia stamp