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American Credo Issue

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4-cent Washington's Farewell Address single

The American Credo (from the Latin for 'I believe. . .') Series of 1960-1961, issued to underscore the ideals upon which the nation stands, features quotations from six heroes of the Republic. A poll of one hundred distinguished Americans, including leaders in public life, historians, and presidents of state universities, helped determine the included quotations.

The featured individuals include George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Frances Scott Key, Abraham Lincoln, and Patrick Henry.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Washington's Farewell Address single

The Post Office Department issued the first stamp in the American Credo Series on January 20, 1960, at Mount Vernon, Virginia, the home of George Washington. The 4-cent stamp features words from Washington's Farewell Address (September 17, 1796), "Observe good faith and justice toward all nations." Like the other American Credo stamps, the 4-cent Washington paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Five plates were used to print the stamp: 26488, 26489, 26494, 26495, and 26508.

Frank P. Conley of New York designed the stamps of this series. Charles R. Chickering modeled the stamp, and Robert J. Jones engraved the die. Both worked for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Benjamin Franklin Quote single

The Post Office Department issued the second stamp in the American Credo Series on March 31, 1960, at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. The 4-cent stamp features a touch of Benjamin Franklin's wisdom, "Fear to do ill, and you need fear nought else," from his Poor Richard's Almanac. Like the other American Credo stamps, the 4-cent Franklin paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Four plates were used to print the stamp: 26582, 26587, 26589, and 26591.

Frank P. Conley of New York designed the stamp, and Charles R. Chickering modeled it. Robert J. Jones engraved the stamp's die's frame, and Howard F. Sharpless engraved its vignette.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Thomas Jefferson Quote single

The third stamp in the American Credo Series was issued on May 18, 1960, at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. Monticello is located near Charlottesville, Virginia. The 4-cent stamp features Jefferson's words, "I have sworn hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man," from his Collected Writings, Vol. 10. Like the other stamps in this series, the 4-cent Jefferson paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Six plates were used to print the stamp: 26608, 26611, 26618, 26623, 26628, and 26629.

Frank P. Conley designed the stamp, and Charles R. Chickering modeled it. Robert J. Jones engraved the die's frame, and William R. Burnell engraved the vignette.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Francis Scott Key Quote single

The Post Office Department issued the fourth stamp in the American Credo Series on September 14, 1960, at Baltimore, Maryland. The 4-cent stamp features a phrase from the National Anthem, written by Francis Scott Key during the bombardment of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812: "And this be our motto, in God is our trust." Like the other stamps of this series, the 4-cent Key paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Four plates were used to print the stamp: 26683, 26693, 26695, and 26696.

Frank P. Conley of New York designed the stamp, and Charles R. Chickering modeled it. Robert J. Jones engraved the die's frame, and George L. Huber engraved its vignette.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Abraham Lincoln Quote single

The fifth stamp in the American Credo Series was issued on November 19, 1960, in New York City during the 12th Annual National Postage Stamp Show. It features words of Abraham Lincoln from a letter written on April 6, 1859, to H.L. Pearce: "Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves." Like the other American Credo stamps, the 4-cent Lincoln paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the 4-cent stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Four plates were used to print the stamp: 26797, 26803, 26805, and 26806.

Frank P. Conley of New York designed the stamp, and Charles R. Chickering modeled it. Robert J. Jones engraved the die's frame, and Howard F. Sharpless engraved its vignette.

Rod Juell

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4-cent Patrick Henry Quote single

The Post Office Department issued the sixth and final stamp of the American Credo Series on January 11, 1961, at Richmond, Virginia. It features the words of Patrick Henry, "Give me liberty or give me death." Henry spoke these now immortal words at the Revolutionary Convention at St. John's Church in Richmond on March 23, 1775. Like the other American Credo stamps, the 4-cent Henry paid the postage for a one-ounce domestic-rate letter.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed the stamp, perforated 11, from 200-subject plates on the multicolor Giori Press. The 200-subject sheets were divided into panes of fifty for distribution to post offices. Four plates were used to print the stamp: 26738, 26741, 26747, and 26752.

Frank P. Conley of New York designed the stamp, and Charles R. Chickering modeled it. Robert J. Jones engraved the die's frame, and Kenneth C. Wiram engraved its vignette.

Rod Juell

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American Credo Issue | National Postal Museum

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