Binding the Nation

July 30, 1993 - Permanent

George Washington envisioned a nation bound together by a system of post roads and post offices. Starting the System documents America's increasing need for a mail system to ensure the free flow of information between citizens and their government. 

The above media is provided by  YouTube (Privacy Policy, Terms of Service)

A short video about the Binding the Nation exhibit at the National Postal Museum.

[Music]

Narrator: Mail hasn't always crisscrossed the country by trucks and planes.

The museum's exhibition, Binding the Nation, tells the account through letters and routes of how Americans secured communication across the continent in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Mails continued pace through wooded paths and eventually roads connected colonial settlements more closely to each other than the European powers that ruled them from afar.

The exhibition retells the transportation innovations and human endeavors that overcame numerous communication challenges as the U.S. gained more territory across the continent.

Plan a visit to the National Postal Museum today.

Documents America's increasing need for a mail system to ensure the free flow of information between citizens and their government.

Explores the connection between the open flow of information and securing a democracy.

Demonstrates how the postal service used waterways and ocean vessels to ensure mail service to individuals as the nation's boundaries grew.

Illustrates the importance of mail to the growing frontier populations and explains how the postal service contracted with stagecoach lines to move the mail across the frontier.

July 30, 1993 - August 15, 1998
Exhibition

When the conflict between the north and south finally exploded into war, the nation's communication system was also ripped in two. The system instituted to unify the country through the dissemination of information was instead used to solidify the break.

Although the exhibit is not currently on display in the Museum, selected portions of the exhibit are still available online.

Learn more