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Life Onboard: Photos

Hindenburg Cabin

Hindenburg cabin
Hindenburg’s cabins featured bunk beds, running water, and a desk. Single accommodations could be reserved, but all passengers shared bathroom facilities.
Courtesy anonymous

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Hindenburg’s Passenger Lounge

Hindenburg's passenger lounge
Travelers gathered in Hindenburg’s passenger lounge for card games and music. They enjoyed an aluminum piano in 1936.
Courtesy anonymous

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Hindenburg’s Dining Room

Hindenburg's dining room
Hindenburg passengers received seating assignments for specific meal times. After dinner, many gathered in the pressurized bar and smoking lounge.
Courtesy anonymous

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Hindenburg’s Observation Windows

Hindenburg's observation windows
Hindenburg's passenger quarters featured observation windows on both the port and starboard sides that opened for fresh air and taking photographs.
Courtesy anonymous

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Titanic’s Dining Saloon

Titanic’s dining saloon
Titanic’s 10,500 square foot first-class dining saloon was the largest room on the ship. It seated 532 passengers at once.

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Titanic First-class Parlor Suite

Titanic first-class parlor suite
The sitting room of a first-class parlor suite on Olympic and Titanic is decorated in the Adam style. The mantelpiece enclosed an electric heater.

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Commander Edward J. Smith

Commander Edward J. Smith
Edward J. Smith, the White Star Line’s most experienced commander, was known as “the Millionaire’s Captain” because some wealthy passengers sailed only on his vessels.
Courtesy Library of Congress

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