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My Fellow Soldiers

Letters from World War I

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American Red Cross postcard from and American Red Cross L. O. C. canteen in France.

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refer to captionMr. A. Piatt Andrew, (American Field Service) to his parents, August 18, 1916,

"[Mrs. Vanderbilt] immediately saw our difficulties and briskly and crisply set about to clear them away."

refer to captionMadame J. Armand, to Mrs. Saunders (mother of Corporal Carl Saunders), March 4, 1919

"It is a mother who is writing to you, a mother who has been with your dear child in his last days."

refer to captionLieutenant Adolf Berle, to his father, February 17, 1919

"With skill the situation might yet be saved."

refer to captionMrs. Betty Boadway, to her husband Lieutenant Walter Boadway, September 10, 1918

"Probably the inclement weather and shortage of planes would be excuse enough to keep you idle . . ."

refer to captionMrs. Betty Boadway, to her husband Lieutenant Walter Boadway, September 27, 1918

"Dear Husband of mine, it is two A.M. and that's an unheard of hour for a staid and settled matron to be writing."

refer to captionLieutenant Walter Boadway, to his wife Betty, October 20, 1918

"I went out with a Red Cross Lieut. named Hemingway . . . He has been here in the hospital 4 months."

refer to captionLieutenant Walter Boadway, to his wife Betty, August 10, 1918

"I really enjoy night flying. It's a good thing I guess because I'll probably have plenty of it soon."

refer to captionPrivate Silas Bradshaw, to Lieutenant Graster, June 22, 1918

"They are not treating me right they have all white officers and no colored."

refer to captionMr. W.C. Campbell, to Mrs. Justice Frick (mother of Sergeant Edwin G. Frick), April 30, 1919

"He passed to his reward with a consciousness of duty done, and with all that was mortal of him enshrouded in the stars and stripes"

refer to captionMrs. Mae Dees, to her husband Private Eliga Dees, May 9, 1918

"We are going to amount to a lot someday. We can be what we want to be."

refer to captionNurse Marion Doane, to her mother and sister, March 5, 1917

"Never have I had such a heart ache as I had after listening to this man's tale."

refer to captionMiss Irene Donnelly, to Private Charles Eggeling, November 7-10, 1918

"God Be Praised. The War is Over."

refer to captionSergeant Clyde Eoff, to his sister Josephine Eoff, October 26, 1918

"Just at supper time they threw some gas shells in the town and interrupted our meal."

refer to captionSergeant Clyde Eoff, to his sister Josephine Eoff, April 28, 1919

"Even the joy of going home failed to make the parting a pleasant one."

refer to captionSergeant Clyde Eoff, to his sister Josephine Eoff, May 30, 1919

"Now you boys come on home live from hand to mouth and give us your vote."

refer to captionPrivate Dwight Fee, to his son Private William Fee, October 1, 1944

"There will be many disagreeable experiences; soul-shaking experiences; tragic experiences; uplifting experiences."

refer to captionPrivate Dwight Fee, to his parents, July 21, 1918

"The Jerrys hid, then a half hour later rushed our trench, throwing bombs."

refer to captionMrs. Lucille Fee, to her husband Private Dwight Fee, July 25, 1918

"Already this war has made me a much better person and I have profited so much by it, except that I am a great deal older."

refer to captionSergeant Edwin G. Frick, to his mother, July 17, 1918

"Don't worry about me, I am happy, safe, and coming back, as soon as the beasts are no more."

refer to captionBelgian student Joseph Gregoire, to President Woodrow Wilson, February 27, 1915

"A terrible war was unleashed on Europe, and on our thriving Belgium."

refer to captionMaurice Hess, to his father , October 6, 1918

"We must stand true to the best light that God has given to us in our endeavor to see and do the right."

refer to captionMr. Conrad Hoffmann Jr. (International YMCA), to his wife Louise, July 23, 1918

"I shall remain gladly for I realize that thereby I can be of real help to our countrymen who become prisoners of war here."

refer to captionMrs. Louise Hoffmann, to her husband Conrad, September 9, 1918

"There is no country like ours and I am so glad you are strong enough to hold out under pressure, and stay American."

refer to captionPrivate Morris E. Kramer, to his father, November 24, 1918

"On the 11th of November at 11 A. M. the guns were to cease firing and all hostilities to stop. I did not believe it until 11 o'clock came."

refer to captionShip's Cook Third Class Hugh Alexander Leslie, to his parents, June 16, 1918

"Our ship, looked as if she knew she was sinking."

refer to captionBelgian student Alexandre Lobet, to President Woodrow Wilson, February 27, 1915

"I just want to express my feelings of gratitude to the noble Nation of the United States."

refer to captionStewart C. Lockhart (AEF Medical Unit 60), to Mrs. Nellie Bailey, Postmarked upon receipt October 14, 1918

"Well, here I am, safe and sound and feeling mighty fine."

refer to captionBelgian student Paul Mage, to President Woodrow Wilson, February 27, 1915

"Famine would have long reigned here if American citizens, with their well- known generosity, had not come to the rescue of the Belgian people."

refer to captionMiss Anna V.S. Mitchell (Red Cross), to her sister Caroline Phelps Stokes, April 1, 1918

"The flames . . . our extra supply of provisions! They were gone."

refer to captionMiss Anna V.S. Mitchell (Red Cross), to her sister Caroline Phelps Stokes, After Peace 1918

"Prisoners out of Germany had started coming through, . . . You have never seen or imagined such pathetic figures, everyone emaciated, in strange ragged garments."

refer to captionChaplain Arthur W. Moulton, to Mrs. R. Goldklang, September 3, 1918

"The cemetery is a beautiful one and your boy lies by the side of other American boys who have made the supreme sacrifice."

refer to captionBelgian student Rene Moureaux, to President Woodrow Wilson, February 27, 1915

"I'd like to find enough eloquent words to express my gratitude for the good you have done."

refer to captionColonel George S. Patton, to his father, October 28, 1918

"You know I have always feared I was a coward at heart but I am beginning to doubt it."

refer to captionMiss Clarine Payne, to her uncle Private James Edgar Thornton, August 30, 1918

"I [must hurry] up and get to the mail box it is all most mail time."

refer to captionBrigadier General John J. Pershing, to family friend Anne Boswell, November 3, 1915

"I shall be tied down with this border patrol indefinitely . . . and am really fortunate to have something to do."

refer to captionBrigadier General John J. Pershing, to family friend Anne Boswell, October 5, 1915

"I am trying to work and keep from thinking; but Oh! The desolation of life . . . after such fullness as I have had."

refer to captionGeneral John J. Pershing, to "My Fellow Soldiers", February 28, 1919

"My Fellow Soldiers . . ."

refer to captionLieutenant John H. Purnell, to Lieutenant T. Montgomery Gregory, June 22, 1918

"It appears that the Colored soldiers in that camp are not getting the proper treatment."

refer to captionMs. Audrey Jane Radcliffe (Stenographer, US Army), to her father, October 27, 1918

"Your dear little girl is at least in France. . . . Be good dear dad & write your little girl."

refer to captionPrivate Dean Robertson, to his family, June 11, 1918

"We are in the field‐not the trenches. You must have read of what the Americans are doing and of the open fighting."

refer to captionPrivate Dean Robertson, to his family, June 21, 1918

"The Huns were on 3 sides & fired on us continually. It was 2 days of Hell."

refer to captionAlfred Robinson (16th Infantry Regiment), to his mother, November 14, 1918

"The Allies are the victors, and the world is a garden of joy, but what has been the cost."

refer to captionAlfred Robinson (16th Infantry Regiment), to his father, August 19, 1917

"I joined because my blood is as red as that of my ancestors who set the stars in Old Glory."

refer to captionNurse Louise Sophia Schroeder, to Ann, November 30, 1918

"When I read of what you are doing at home, I feel like we are the slackers."

refer to captionMrs. Alice Stevanus, to her son US Army Cook Harry Stevanus, August 24, 1918

"Those that are mamed and wonded oho my dear child may god have mersy and heal them strong and well fore i know it was for a good cause and will never be forgotten."

refer to captionMrs. Verna Stevanus, to her mother-in-law Alice , August 19, 1918

"We know it is hard to see him coming back a cripple but still that is better than not at all."

refer to captionChief Nurse Julia Stimson, to her parents , October 13-18, 1918

"I'm going to see if I can't put the job of Chief Nurse of the AEF on the map."

refer to captionChief Nurse Julia Stimson, to her family, May 4-6, 1917.

"We have less than a week's notice to get ready for mobilization for service in France."

refer to captionChief Nurse Julia Stimson, to her family , July 25, 1917

"We have been receiving patients that have been gassed, and burned in a most mysterious way."

refer to captionChief Nurse Julia Stimson, to her family , November 25, 1917

"It is a fearful thing to have the responsibility of one hundred women so far away from home."

refer to captionMr. Charles Edgar Thornton, to his father Private James Edgar Thornton, February 19, 1918

"Dear dadie I received your most loveing letter to day."

refer to captionPrivate James Edgar Thornton, to his son Charles Edgar, February 15, 1918

"You all muss be good boys and help mother take care of little sister."

refer to captionMrs. Sarah Thornton, to her husband Private James Edgar Thornton, August 20, 1918

"Bell and Jack are well and [send] love. Yes I am still getting my money but I [haven't] got my July check yet."

refer to captionCaptain Harry S. Truman, to his fiancée Bess Wallace, February 18, 1919

"General [Pershing] told me . . . that he wanted me to take [my troops] home as clean morally and physically as when they came over."

refer to captionPrivate Raeburn Van Buren, to his mother September 15, [1918]

"I loathe these 'swivel chair' soldiers who are doing their fighting with a pencil in some comfortable little room in Paris or Washington."

refer to captionPrivate Raeburn Van Buren, to his mother August 28, 1918

"These little pup tents we use are poor shelter from a downpour of rain unless much time is spent in entrenching works."

refer to captionPrivate Raeburn Van Buren, to his grandparents, October 8, 1918

"Must Go Now!"

refer to captionPrivate David Willey, to Lieutenant Simmons, June 21, 1918

"The captain kicked me and called us all kinds of names."

refer to captionYeoman First Class Charles Edmund Worth, to his mother, July 16, 1918

"Cease to be a horrified victim and become a proud victor."

Soldiers holding guns marching through a field