Stamp Stories: Fiddler Crabs

Just for Kids!
 
44-cent Northern Kelp Crab stamp

Discover how the topics of fiddler crabs, tropical biodiversity, and the Panama Canal are all connected with this fully bilingual video (English/Spanish). Educators from the National Postal Museum and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute lead this exploration through images, a children’s book, and postage stamps.

//

Descubra cómo los temas de los cangrejos violinistas, la biodiversidad tropical, y el Canal de Panamá están conectados con este video completamente bilingüe (inglés/español). Educadores del Museo Postal Nacional y del dInstituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales dirigen esta exploración a través de imágenes, un libro para niños y sellos postales.

Northern Kelp Crab stamp

Pacific Rock Crab, Jeweled Top Snail stamp

The above media is provided by  YouTube (Privacy Policy, Terms of Service)

Maureen: Hi, I’m Maureen from the National Postal Museum.
[Spanish]

Jimena: I’m Jimena from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.
[Spanish]

Maureen: Welcome to Stamp Stories, where we explore topics that appear on postage stamps.
[Spanish]

Jimena: Today we’re going to learn about fiddler crabs.
[Spanish]

There are many fiddler crabs at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (called STRI for short), along with a lot of other animals. The Institute is part of the Smithsonian, but you can see from these pictures it is a bit different from the museums you might be familiar with.
[Spanish]

Most of the Smithsonian museums are located in Washington, DC. STRI is located in the country of Panama, to the south of the United States. It’s in the Panama Canal Zone.
[Spanish]

The Panama Canal Zone is a famous place in Central America where ships can cross between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.
[Spanish]

I work at a part of STRI called the Punta Culebra Nature Center. We have so many different kinds of animals there representative of the tropical ecosystems in Panama.
[Spanish]

We have anteaters,
[Spanish]
sloths,
[Spanish]
endangered frogs,
[Spanish]
fish,
[Spanish]
and other ocean animals,
[Spanish]
There’s a beautiful beach called Crab Beach, that gets its name from the fantastic fiddler crabs that live there.
[Spanish]

These are all pictures of fiddler crabs. Do you see those large pincers? Fiddler crabs are known for having one claw that is much larger than the other.
[Spanish]

Their large claw is an adaptation they have. They wave their claws to communicate with each other. Can you wave your arm like a fiddler crab?
[Spanish]

There are about 100 species of fiddler crabs around the world, and 16 of those can be found in the United States.
[Spanish]

We have 30 different kinds in the country of Panama, and four of those species live here in Punta Culebra.
[Spanish]

This map shows what it would look like if you put the country of Panama inside the United States.
[Spanish]
Panama is so much smaller than the US, but it has a lot of biodiversity.
[Spanish]
Because we are in the tropics, we don’t have four seasons like the US does. We have two seasons: dry and rainy, and we have many plants and animals that are not found in the US.
[Spanish]
This is what makes it such a great place for Smithsonian scientists to do research.
[Spanish]

Maureen: Thanks for sharing all that information with us, Jimena!
[Spanish]

Let’s learn more about fiddler crabs by reading a children’s book inspired by STRI scientists’ research! This book is called Crandall the Curious Crab, written by John Christy and Robert Keddell, and illustrated by Michelle Seu.

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Crandall the Fiddler Crab liked to look out from his sand burrow in Singapore and imagine what the rest of the world was like. He saw the big ships going by and wondered: “Where would a mighty ocean ship take me?”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: The next morning, Curious Crandall found himself floating on a piece of wood next to the largest ship in the harbor! With a leap and grab, Crandall Crab hung on!

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Clinging to the anchor of the big ship was scary, but Crandall Crab was not alone. Barnacles were everywhere! Crandall called out, “Where are we going?” “Panama!” replied one big old barnacle. “Panama?!” said Crandall. “Great!”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: The next morning, the wise barnacle explained to Crandall: “Our ship is going to cross from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean through the Panama Canal. When we come to a beach named Crab Beach in a place called Punta Culebra you must jump, sink and scurry to shore.”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: When the time came, he jumped. After a great deal of scurrying, Crandall finally made it to the shore. Crandall was very tired, but his exhaustion didn’t last long...

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: When he looked, there was a human being right in front of him! He knew that humans often do things that are really bad for fiddler crabs, so Crandall began to scream: “Run for your lives!! It’s a human!!”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: The other crabs on the beach explained. “That is Dr. John Christy. He is a scientist who works for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. He keeps grackles, our most dangerous predator bird, off the beach while he observes our behaviors.” Crandall was shocked! “Don’t you see he has a weapon with bird feet?”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Crandall’s new fiddler crab friend Carmen said, “Come with me, let’s take a closer look.” She led him closer to Dr. Christy. “Dr. Christy is very patient and tries to learn about how we get away from crab-eating grackles. He even invents things like that bird foot wheel to see how we respond to vibrations in the sand like those made by a grackle hunting us.”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Carmen led Crandall near a grackle and whispered, “This is a crab-eating shorebird that we must watch out for. Amazingly, as a female crab, I don’t usually become bird food because males like you warn us,” she said. “When you wave your large claw to signal danger the females know they should stay safely in their burrows.”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: That night in the burrow Carmen and Crandall talked about Singapore and then Panama. They discovered that they were both curious crabs indeed. She said, “Do you know, Crandall, one day I heard an oyster talking about a place called the Chesapeake Bay. Perhaps we could travel there together.”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Crandall could not believe what Carmen was saying. He began to shout, “YES! YES...LET’S GO TOGETHER! Together we can be curious, brave, and strong, and travel to our new beach on the Chesapeake Bay!”

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Crandall knew he could find a ship nearby and help Carmen grab on with him. “I know we'll be able to find fiddler crabs all around the world,” he thought. With a wave of his claw, and at just the right moment, they would scoot quickly down the beach and scurry to find a ship headed to some place exciting...maybe even the Chesapeake Bay.

Jimena: [Spanish]

Maureen: Do you think Crandall and Carmen ever made it to the Chesapeake Bay? They might find fiddler crabs there, just like they would in bodies of water all over the world! Fiddler crabs are one of thousands of species of crabs. Here are two kinds that are featured on postage stamps in the United States: a Pacific Rock Crab and a Northern Kelp Crab.
[Spanish]

Although the US stamps show different kinds of crab, there are stamps from all over the world that have fiddler crabs on them. Here are a few examples. You can see one from Taiwan, the British Virgin Islands, Tonga, and Mauritius.
[Spanish]

We learned from the book that grackles are a predator of fiddler crabs. Grackles are a type of blackbird. We can also find them on stamps! Here are three images of grackles, from Grenada, Nicaragua, and Cuba, which are all small countries in the same part of the world as Panama.
[Spanish]

As we mentioned before, one of the most famous places in Panama is the Panama Canal. Countries from all over the world rely on it to help move their ships quickly along their shipping routes. The Canal has been featured on stamps many times. The stamps you see here were issued by the Panama Canal Zone for use in Panama. One of them shows a map of the Canal, and the other shows a ship travelling through it. They both have the words “Canal Zone” stamped on them.
[Spanish]

Maureen: The United States has also issued many stamps celebrating the Panama Canal. The stamp on the left commemorates the opening of the Canal in 1914, and shows a large ship, like the kind Crandall the Crab travelled through the Canal on in the book we read! The stamp on the right commemorates the establishment of the Canal Zone Biological Area in 1923. This is where the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute is located, and it’s a really important place for scientific studies and citizen education.
[Spanish]

Jimena: It was fun to make a connection between STRI and postage stamps! What a great way to learn a little about the amazing biodiversity in Panama. And there’s so much more you can discover by visiting STRI’s website.
[Spanish]

Maureen: Thank you so much, Jimena, and thank you to our audience for joining us today. You can also learn more about animals on stamps, the Panama Canal, and so many other topics, by visiting the National Postal Museum’s website.
[Spanish]

We encourage you to just keep exploring!
[Spanish]

Maureen: [Inglés]
Hola, soy Maureen del Museo Postal Nacional.

Jimena: [Inglés]
Hola, soy Jimena del Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales.

Maureen: [Inglés]
Bienvenidos a Los Cuentos de Sellos, dónde exploramos temas que aparecen en los sellos postales.

Jimena: [Inglés]
Hoy vamos a aprender sobre los cangrejos violinistas.

[Inglés]
Hay muchos cangrejos violinistas en el Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales (o Smithsonian en versión corta), junto con muchos otros animales. El Instituto es parte del Smithsonian, pero como puedes ver en esta imagen, no se parece a los museos con los que podrías estar familiarizado.

[Inglés]
La mayoría de los museos del Smithsonian se encuentran en Washington, DC. El Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales se encuentra en el país de Panamá, al sur de los Estados Unidos. Está en la Zona del Canal de Panamá.

[Inglés]
El Canal de Panamá es un lugar famoso en Centroamérica donde los barcos pueden cruzar entre los océanos Atlántico y Pacífico.

[Inglés]
Trabajo en una parte del Smithsonian llamado el Centro Natural Punta Culebra. Tenemos varios tipos de animales representativos de los ecosistemas tropicales de Panamá.

[Inglés]
Tenemos osos hormigueros,
[Inglés]
perezosos,
[Inglés]
ranas en peligro de extinción,
[Inglés]
peces,
[Inglés]
y otros animales del océano.
[Inglés]
Hay una hermosa playa llamada Playa del Cangrejo, que recibe su nombre de los fantásticos cangrejos violinistas que viven allí.

[Inglés]
Todas estas son imágenes de cangrejos violinistas. ¿Puedes ver sus pinzas grandes? Los cangrejos violinistas son conocidos por tener una garra mucho más grande que la otra.

[Inglés]
Su gran pinza es una adaptación que tienen. Agitan sus pinzas para comunicarse entre sí. ¿Puedes mover tu brazo como un cangrejo violinista?

[Inglés]
Hay alrededor de 100 especies de cangrejos violinistas en todo el mundo, y 16 de ellas se pueden encontrar en los Estados Unidos.

[Inglés]
Tenemos 30 tipos distintos en el país de Panamá, y cuatro de esas especies viven aquí en Punta Culebra.

[Inglés]
Este mapa muestra cómo se vería si pusiera el país de Panamá dentro de los Estados Unidos.
[Inglés]
Panamá es mucho más pequeño que Estados Unidos, pero tiene mucha biodiversidad.
[Inglés]
Debido a que estamos en los trópicos, no tenemos cuatro estaciones como en los Estados Unidos. Tenemos dos estaciones: seca y lluviosa, y tenemos muchas plantas y animales que no se encuentran en los EE.UU.
[Inglés]
Esto es lo que convierte a Panamá en un gran lugar para que los científicos del Smithsonian investiguen.

Maureen: [Inglés]
Gracias por compartir toda esa información con nosotros, Jimena!

[Inglés]

Jimena: ¡Aprendamos más sobre los cangrejos violinistas leyendo un libro para niños inspirado en la investigación de los científicos del Smithsonian! Este libro se llama Crandall, el Cangrejo Curioso, escrito por John Christy y Robert Keddell, e ilustrado por Michelle Seu.

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: A Crandall, el cangrejo violinista, le gustaba mirar desde su madriguera de arena en Singapur e imaginar cómo era el resto del mundo. Vio pasar los grandes barcos y se preguntó: "¿A dónde me llevaría un poderoso barco oceánico?"

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: A la mañana siguiente, Crandall, el curioso se encontró flotando en un trozo de madera junto al barco más grande del puerto. ¡Con un salto y agarre, el cangrejo Crandall se sujetó muy fuerte!

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Aferrarse al ancla del gran barco daba miedo, pero Crandall el cangrejo no estaba solo. ¡Los percebes estaban por todas partes! Crandall gritó: "¿A dónde vamos?" "¡Panamá!" respondió un gran percebe. "¡¿Panamá?!" dijo Crandall. "¡Excelente!"

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: A la mañana siguiente, el sabio percebe le explicó a Crandall: “Nuestro barco va a cruzar del Océano Pacífico al Océano Atlántico a través del Canal de Panamá. Cuando llegamos a una playa llamada Playa del Cangrejo en un lugar que se llama Punta Culebra, debes saltar, hundirte y escabullirte hasta la orilla.”

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Cuando llegó el momento, saltó. Después de correr mucho, Crandall finalmente llegó a la orilla. Crandall estaba muy cansado, pero su agotamiento no duró mucho …

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Cuando miró, ¡había un ser humano justo frente a él! Sabía que los humanos a menudo hacen cosas que son realmente malas para los cangrejos violinistas, así que Crandall comenzó a gritar: “¡¡Corran por sus vidas !! ¡¡Es un humano !!"

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Los otros cangrejos en la playa explicaron. “Ese es el Dr. John Christy. Es un científico que trabaja para el Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales. Mantiene a los talingos, nuestro ave depredadora más peligrosa, fuera de la playa mientras observa nuestros comportamientos ". ¡Crandall se sorprendió! "¿No ves que tiene un arma con patas de pájaro?"

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Carmen, la cangrejo violinista y nueva amiga de Crandall, dijo: "Ven conmigo, echemos un vistazo más de cerca". Ella lo llevó más cerca al Dr. Christy. "El Dr. Christy es muy paciente y trata de aprender cómo nos alejamos de los talingos que comen cangrejos. Incluso inventa cosas como esa rueda de pie de pájaro para ver cómo respondemos a las vibraciones en la arena, como las que produce un talingo que nos caza."

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Carmen llevó a Crandall cerca de un talingo y susurró: “Este es un ave playera que se alimenta de cangrejos y debemos estar atentos. Sorprendentemente, como una cangrejo hembra, ¡no suelo convertirme en alimento para aves ya que machos como tú nos advierten! ", dijo ella. “Cuando mueves tu gran garra para señalar peligro las hembras saben que deben permanecer a salvo en sus madrigueras."

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Esa noche en la madriguera Carmen y Crandall hablaron de Singapur y luego de Panamá. Descubrieron que ambos eran cangrejos curiosos. Ella dijo: “¿Sabes, Crandall? Un día escuché a una ostra hablando de un lugar llamado Bahia de Chesapeake. Quizás podríamos viajar juntos allí."

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Crandall no podía creer lo que decía Carmen. Comenzó a gritar: “¡SÍ! SÍ ... ¡VAMOS JUNTOS! ¡Juntos podemos ser curiosos, valientes y fuertes, y viajar a nuestra nueva playa en la Bahía de Chesapeake!"

Maureen: [Inglés]

Jimena: Crandall sabía que podía encontrar un barco cerca y ayudar a Carmen a agarrarlo. "Sé que podremos encontrar cangrejos violinistas en todo el mundo", pensó. Con un movimiento de su garra, y en el momento justo, se deslizaron rápidamente por la playa y se apresuraron a encontrar un barco que se dirigiera a algún lugar emocionante ... tal vez incluso a la bahía de Chesapeake.

Maureen: [Inglés]
¿Crees que Crandall y Carmen llegaron alguna vez a la bahía de Chesapeake? ¡Puede encontrar cangrejos violinistas allí, como lo harían en cuerpos de agua en todo el mundo! Los cangrejos violinistas son una de las miles de especies de cangrejos. Aquí hay dos tipos que aparecen en los sellos postales en los Estados Unidos: un cangrejo de roca del Pacífico y un cangrejo de algas marinas del norte.

[Inglés]
Aunque los sellos de EE. UU. Muestran diferentes tipos de cangrejos, hay sellos de todo el mundo que tienen cangrejos violinistas. Aquí están algunos ejemplos. Puede ver uno de Taiwán, las Islas Vírgenes Británicas, Tonga y Mauricio.

[Inglés]
Aprendimos del libro que los talingos son un depredador de los cangrejos violinistas. Los talingos son un tipo de Ictéridos. ¡También los podemos encontrar en sellos! Aquí hay tres imágenes de talingos, de Granada, Nicaragua y Cuba, que son todos países pequeños en la misma parte del mundo que Panamá.

[Inglés]
Como mencionamos anteriormente, uno de los lugares más famosos de Panamá es el Canal de Panamá. Países de todo el mundo dependen de él para ayudar a mover sus barcos rápidamente a lo largo de sus rutas de envío. El Canal ha aparecido muchas veces en sellos. Los sellos que ves aquí fueron emitidos por la Zona del Canal de Panamá para su uso en Panamá. Uno de ellos muestra un mapa del Canal y el otro muestra un barco que lo atraviesa. Ambos tienen estampadas las palabras "Zona del Canal."

Maureen: [Inglés]
Estados Unidos también ha emitido muchos sellos celebrando el Canal de Panamá. El sello de la izquierda conmemora la apertura del Canal en 1914 y muestra un barco grande, como el tipo de barco que el cangrejo Crandall recorrió a través del Canal en el libro que leímos. El sello de la derecha conmemora el establecimiento del Área Biológica de la Zona del Canal en 1923. Aquí se encuentra el Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales, y es un lugar realmente importante para los estudios científicos y la educación ciudadana.

Jimena: [Inglés]
¡Fue divertido hacer una conexión entre el Smithsonian y los sellos postales! Qué gran manera de aprender un poco sobre la increíble biodiversidad de Panamá. Y hay mucho más que puedes descubrir visitando el sitio web del Smithsonian.

Maureen: [Inglés]
Muchas gracias, Jimena, y gracias a nuestra audiencia por acompañarnos hoy. También puede obtener más información sobre los animales en las estampillas, el Canal de Panamá y muchos otros temas visitando el sitio web del Museo Postal Nacional.

[Inglés]
¡Te animamos a que sigas explorando!